3 Things You Didn’t Know About Supreme

3 Things You Didn’t Know About Supreme

Supreme shirtsSkaters, hipsters and celebrities have been rocking the Supreme brand since it’s inception in the mid-90s, when it was founded by the mysterious but alluring James Jebbia. The brand has since grown a cult following and attained icon status. Today, you can spot Supreme hats, Supreme backpacks, and Supreme shirts on city streets, in high schools, and even in workplaces. And for the 11 million people who report that they enjoy skateboarding, Supreme has served as a faithful supplier of skate worthy apparel for over a decade. But the fact is that not many people know much about the brand to which they pledge their loyalty. In fact, part of the pull of Supreme brand clothing, besides its hip and street savvy appeal, is the mystery of its origins and founder, James Jebbia. It’s time to lay your curiosity to rest. Check out these three facts about the Supreme clothing brand you probably didn’t know:

  • James Jebbia had his origins in another notorious clothing company — Stussy NYC. He helped open it before founding Supreme. Jebbia was actually still working at Stussy while running his new skate shop. It only cost him around $12,000 to open Supreme back in 1994.
  • The Supreme logo is inspired by a number of different sources — the accent about the first “e” is inspired by french modernist designer Andre Courreges, and the boxy shape and design is based in part on Barbara Kruger’s propaganda art. The iconic font is Futura Heavy Oblique. Unlike most major apparel brands, James Jebbia doesn’t own the name “Supreme,” which means he can’t trademark it, if he would even want to.
  • When Supreme opened up a London location in 2011, Jebbia wanted to work with British designer Vivienne Westwood, and the brand is expected to open a European webshop at the end of the year. It should be pretty profitable, too. According to retail experts, if an online-only store and brick-and-mortar store had identical sales numbers, the online store would make at least $100,000 more a year. While many Supreme fans are obsessed with visiting the handful of locations around the globe, digital spaces are the next frontier for Jebbia’s brand.

So, there you have it. Hopefully, the portrait you have formed about the Supreme brand is a little bit better formed in your mind now. If you want to make a good impression in the streetwear fashion or skating world (remember: people decide on your trustworthiness in a tenth of a second), you can always rely on Supreme shirts and apparel.